The International Health, Racquet & Sportsclub Association is the fitness industry's only global trade association representing over 10,000 for profit health and fitness facilities and over 600 supplier companies in 75 countries.

 

 



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Tuesday
Jul112017

How to Stop Gym Germs Before They Harm Your Members

This is an IHRSA featured post, brought to you by 2XL.

Whether or not you self-identify as a neatnik, a tidy gym does have a direct effect on your profitability. 

According to an IHRSA report, 90% of consumers surveyed said they were more likely to renew their membership if their club was clean. And while clutter and dirt are easy enough to locate and remove, invisible germs can create hazards that can have far-reaching effects on membership. Clubs market health and fitness, and a reputation for flu outbreaks and other bacterial havoc can create terrible word of mouth. 

Despite the best efforts of gym owners, these invisible dangers are there. You’ve seen videos of infra-red light that reveal large germy splotches of bacteria on surfaces that otherwise look perfectly clean. Yuck. 

Club operators can only do so much. Members are responsible for washing their hands, wiping down equipment, and other habits of good hygiene. But germs are relentless—ask an evolutionary biologist—and they don’t go away easily. One study found that 63% of all gym equipment has traces of rhinovirus, the germ that causes the common cold. 

Against such odds, the best club owners can hope to do is offer the best tools to members for keeping their facilities clean. Towels, washroom sinks, soap dispensers can help, but is it enough? 

The Surprising Advantages of Hand Sanitizers 

The quality of cleansers, hand soaps, sanitizers, and other personal cleaning products matter. But so does the way you use them. If you are inclined to post guidelines on using personal cleaning products—personal trainers and employees, at the least, should be educated on the subject—you should know that friction is necessary to loosen and remove all those nasty microbes that can put you in a sick bed.

Makes sense. But here’s something that may surprise you: simply relying on soap and water in the locker room may not do the trick.

According to health experts, waterless hand sanitizers can provide a critical edge in the battle against gym germs. Hand sanitizers…

  • take less time than traditional hand washing;
  • kill germs quickly;
  • are easily accessible;
  • mitigate against antimicrobial resistance;
  • do not irritate skin like soap;
  • and even improve skin condition in some situations.

But, again, quality matters. You need DIY solutions that are effective and ready to take on the messy work of eliminating gym germs in a busy environment.

A Stone Cold Killer in a Bottle 

2XL knows what you’re up against. The company has 20 years of extensive experience in manufacturing cost-effective cleaning products for fitness facilities that range from wipes to hand foams, but their new foaming sanitizers are poised to become the go-to standard for promoting gym cleanliness in high-traffic health clubs. 

Available in both alcohol and alcohol-free versions, the 2XL Foaming Hand Sanitizer is non-flammable and designed to cling to hands and not pool on the floor into slippery wet spots. These commercial sanitizers are biodegradable, dermatologist tested, and vitamin-enriched (with vitamins A and E). 2XL’s sanitizers also:  

  • kill 99.99% of common germs;
  • are clinically proven to not irritate skin;
  • contain no dyes or colorants;
  • are environmentally sound.

Visit 2XL’s website to learn more about their cleaning products, including their popular gym wipes. If you’re not taking every step to keep your facility clean, you’re sick—or on your way to getting there.