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Entries in water (3)

Tuesday
Jul162013

Be sure to replace electrolytes as well as fluids

It is summer in these parts, so working out in extreme heat is the norm. But as we all know, there are precautions that need to be taken.

The most important and obvious is replacing one's fluids. Drinking plenty of water is essential. A little lesser known are electrolytes. These are positive ions that regulate fluids.

While working out and sweating, a body loses fluids a lot quicker and in bigger amounts than electrolytes. So, you will need to drink more water than replacing electrolytes.

For more, click here.

Monday
Jul132009

Best Practices for Stretching in Water

"I just began teaching an aqua stretch class. On land the stretches should be held 20-30 seconds. It seems water everything is different - heart rate, impact, etc...

Q: "Is there different criteria for water stretches?"

A:There have been many studies conducted with flexibility in mind. The majority of land studies conclude that static stretches should be performed with warm muscles and held for 30 seconds to achieve the maximal benefit. This statement seems to be dependent on age (Younger (<39) 30 seconds, older (>65) 60 seconds).

There is also a great body of evidence that supports that total daily stretching time has more influence on improving flexibility than a single bout (ex: 10 second hamstring stretch performed 6 times per day).

As on land, stretching in the water should be performed after warming up the muscles. When determining stretching duration, the aquatic environment should be taken into account. If you are performing stretches in a cooler body of water, a shorter static stretch followed by dynamic exercises should be performed to assist in maintaining muscle temperature. In a warmer pool, maintenance of muscle temperature will not pose as much of a challenge and thus stretches can be longer in duration and without interruption.

The aquatic environment provides unique properties to assist in increasing range of motion. Learning how to utilize this environment will assist in providing depth to any aquatic class.

Lori A. Sherlock, Research Committee Co-Chair
Aquatic Exercise Association, Inc.
941/486-8600
www.aeawave.com

References:
1. Bandy, W.D., Irion, J.M., & Briggler, M. (1997). The effect of time and frequency of static stretching on flexibility of the hamstring muscles. Physical Therapy, 77, 1090-1096
2. Cipriani, D., Abel, B., & Pirrwitz, D. (2003). A comparison of two stretching protocols on hip range of motion: implications for total daily stretch duration. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 17, 274-278
3. Feland, J.B., Myrer, J.W., Schulthies, S.S., Fellingham, G.W., & Measom, G.W. (2001). The effect of duration of stretching of the hamstring muscle group for increasing range of motion in people aged 65 years or older. Physical Therapy, 81, 1110-1117

Monday
Jul062009

Ideal Temperature for Water Aerobics

Q: "What is ideal temperature for water aerobics?"

A: That’s a tough one. Water temperature is a lot like music, everyone has their personal preferences.

It is hard to please both the hardcore lap swimmer who would prefer the water temp was 78-79 degrees and the senior member with arthritis who would like to get into 86-88 degree water.

Unless you have the luxury of a dedicated warm water therapy pool, you would normally split the difference and keep the temp as close to 81 degrees as possible. Water aerobics participants can generally begin moving quickly enough to overcome the initial jolt to their system and get their heart rate pumping sufficiently to adjust to 81 degree water.

Bob Shoulders, Owner
Fayetteville Athletic Club
bshoulders@fayac.com
www.fayac.com

A: According to the American College of Sports Medicine - “Health / Fitness Facility Standards and Guidelines” (second edition), the appropriate temperature for fitness facility pools is between 78 and 86 degrees Fahrenheit.

Experience suggest that most “lap swimmers” prefer 78 – 80 degrees, most “aqua aerobics participants” prefer 81 – 83 degrees, and most “aqua therapy / rehabilitation clients” prefer 84 – 86 degrees. These ranges work great of course if you have specific pools for each purpose. If not, as is the case with most health clubs, a compromise of 80 – 82 seems to work best.

Brent Darden, Owner
TELOS Fitness Center
bdarden@telosfitnesscenter.com
www.telosfitnesscenter.com