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Entries in spring sale (21)

Monday
Jun272016

Strengthen Your Health Club Staff with IHRSA's Professional Development and Management Videos

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout. 

A well-trained staff is a pillar of every successful health club, and studies have shown that educated, motivated employees result in higher member engagement and retention. But, unfortunately, many health club owners don’t have the time or resources to properly train their staff. 

To alleviate this pain point, IHRSA has developed a series of Professional Development and Management videos, which make it easy and cost-effective to train staff in all aspects of sales, service, and marketing. 

Titles include: 

Sales

  •  Selling Club Memberships (with Karen Woodward)
  •  Managing the Sales Team and Process (with Bill McBride)
  •  Selling Club Services to Corporations (with Bill McBride)
  •  Non-Sales Professional's Guide to Selling Club Services and Products(with Stephen Tharrett) 

Member Service/Retention 

  • Engaging New Members in the Club (with Brent Darden)
  • Creating a Warm and Welcoming Club Environment (with Brent Darden)
  • Creating and Sustaining a Member-Service Culture (with Herb Lipsman)
  • Increasing Membership Retention in the Health and Fitness Industry (with Bill McBride) 

Marketing 

  • Establishing a Powerful Online Presence (with Bill McBride)
  • Branding: Establishing a Promise That Engages the Emotions (with Stephen Tharrett)
  • Marketing: Communicating Your Brand’s Value Proposition (with Stephen Tharrett)
  • Digital Marketing (with Guy Dineen) 

These 12 videos are available in the IHRSA Store in a variety of formats, including DVD and digital download.

Monday
Jun202016

IHRSA 2016 Session Recordings Available Now for Download

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout. 

There’s nothing worse than the dreaded commute to work—especially for fitness professionals. You’re excited to get to the club and start another day of doing what you love, but first you have to sit in traffic or deal with crowds on public transit. 

It’s an unavoidable waste of time. But it doesn’t have to be.   

All IHRSA 2016 session MP3 audio recordings are now available for download in the IHRSA Store

Thousands of fitness industry leaders celebrated IHRSA 2016 in Orlando, March 21-24. The event showcased the newest and most innovative equipment, programs, and technology from over 400 exhibitors, reinforced the industry’s commitment to increase physical activity levels across the globe, and provided an unparalleled venue to learn, network, and exchange ideas. 

The Convention featured dozens of educational sessions on several topics, including:  

  • Customer Service & Retention
  • Fitness & Personal Training
  • Health Promotion & Wellness
  • Leadership
  • Management & Operations
  • Membership Sales & Marketing
  • Programming
  • Research & Industry Trends
  • Technology & Social Media  

Whether you attended the event or not, there are a multitude of learning opportunities to be had by listening to the session recordings. 

And if you’re an IHRSA member, we have even more good news: all IHRSA Convention recordings from 2013 and earlier are available to you for free.   

So, check out the available recordings at the IHRSA Store and make your next commute a motivational learning experience. And don't forget to use promo code 2016SALE to save 25% on purchases through June 30.

Monday
Jun132016

9 Health Club Employee Benefits Trends 

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout. 

The 2015 IHRSA Employee Compensation & Benefits Report contains the most complete, accurate, and up-to-date compensation data in the club industry.

The report is designed to allow a company to easily compare its compensation levels for approximately 50 common job titles in the industry. These job titles include positions in senior management, salaried club-level employees, and hourly club-level employees.

In addition to compensation information, responding companies provided data on employee benefits offered, health insurance practices, retirement plans, vacation, and sick leave. 

The latest report identified nine employee benefits trends for health clubs.  

  1. Most responding companies provide medical insurance to their salaried employees (98%) and hourly employees (71%). On average, companies pay 71% of the premium for salaried club-level employees and 63% of the premium for hourly club-level employees.
  2. Approximately 46% also provide medical insurance to dependents. On average, companies pay for 29% of the family coverage premium for salaried club-level employees and 26% of the family coverage premium for hourly club-level employees.
  3. Of those providing health insurance, the most popular types are PPO (26%), HMO (26%), and high deductible/HSA plans (23%).
  4. On average, responding companies experienced a 4.9% increase in health care premiums from 2013 to 2014.
  5. Nearly 80% of the responding companies offer a retirement plan to employees. Of those companies, a 401(k) plan is 
clearly the most popular type of plan (86% offer one).
  6. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents match employee contributions to the 401(k) plan.
  7. The average number of paid leave days offered to salaried employees ranges from ten for employees with less than one year on the job to 24 days for salaried employees with over ten years tenure.
  8. The average number of paid leave days offered to hourly employees ranges from seven for employees with less than one year on the job to 19 for hourly employees with over ten years tenure.
  9. One-third of the responding companies allow unused vacation to carry over to the next year. Fewer (17%) allow employees to receive compensation for unused sick days. 

This post was excerpted from The 2015 IHRSA Employee Compensation & Benefits Report.

Monday
May232016

Personal Training Usage Continues to Grow Among Health Club Members

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout. 

Personal training is often the second-largest source of revenue for many health clubs and, in the case of many studios, it’s their primary source of revenue.

IHRSA’s Profiles of Success notes that leading club operators generate a median of 10% of total revenues from personal training. Incremental membership growth over the past several years has motivated club operators to seek new revenue sources and, consequently, the emphasis on monetizing the member experience through personal training (individual and small group). This year’s findings offer a window into the world of personal training to identify behaviors and trends that might help club operators prosper.

Personal Training Usage Moves Upward in 2014

In 2014, 15% of health club members and 15.4% of non-member users engaged in at least one personal training session. This represents an 11% increase over 2013, when 13.5% of members took part in at least one personal training session.

Among the 15% of members who have taken at least one personal training session over the past year, men are more likely to participate than women, with 16% of men and 14% of women engaging in personal training at least once in the past year, both increases from 2013. Among non-members, where overall participation was 15.4%, men and women were equally likely to engage in personal training.

Key distinctions in personal training participation can be observed across the various industry segments. The penetration percentage for members using personal training at least once in 2014 for traditional clubs ranges from 15% in nonprofits to 28% in multipurpose clubs, while for studio segments it ranges from 28% to 57%. It should be noted that the high levels of personal training participation for many of these studio facilities could be attributed to their heavy reliance on small group training.

In 2014, personal training clients worked with a trainer an average of 25 times over the course of the year, with women using the services of a trainer for an average of 32 times, in comparison with 20 sessions for men. The majority of members engage in personal training less than 10 times annually, with 59% of personal training clients using a personal trainer fewer than 10 times annually. On the other end of the spectrum, 15% of members engage with a trainer at least 50 times a year (super consumers) and women are nearly twice as likely to be a super consumer as men.

Personal Training Demographics – The Influence of Age and Income

Adults ages 25 to 34, along with youth 6 to 12, were the most likely to engage in personal training. Adults between the ages 35 and 44 closely followed these two younger age groups with 19% of personal training clients derived from this audience.

It’s worth noting that adults over age 55 are the least likely to leverage the expertise of a personal trainer, with fewer than 10% doing so. Viewing personal training trends by age group as a percentage of the overall membership, rather than just as a percentage of a specific age group, reveals that 6- to 12-year-olds, 25- to 34-year-olds, and 35- to 44-year-olds each represent 3% of the total membership base.

Personal training has proven to be the domain of the more affluent; 7% of members earning in excess of $100,000 annually engage in personal training—more than twice the percentage of any other HHI group that engages in personal training. No other HHI group has more than 2.4% of its membership group involved in personal training.

Finally, nearly 8% of all personal training clients are Caucasian health club members (over 50% of all personal training clients). Hispanic members are the second largest segment of personal training clients, representing 3.5% of all members (17% of all personal training clients). 

This post was excerpted from the 2015 Health Club Consumer Report.

Monday
May162016

IHRSA Report: Health Clubs Saw 5.3% Revenue Growth from 2013 to 2014

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout. 

Overall, health clubs posted revenue growth of 5.3% from 2013 to 2014, according to our 2015 Profiles of Success report. 

Multipurpose and independent clubs reported median retention rates of 69% and 79%, respectively. Fitness-only clubs reported a median net membership growth of 4.2%, while clubs part of a chain achieved a median net membership growth of 9.4%—the highest among all segments observed. 

"IHRSA's annual industry data survey results indicate that leading club operators continue to play to their strengths as respondents recorded improvements in key financial and membership metrics," said Jay Ablondi, IHRSA's executive vice president of global products. “This year’s results show multipurpose and independent club reported strong retention results in 2014, while fitness-only and chain facilities posted high net membership growth. All segments increased revenue on a year-over-year basis.” 

The report provides a detailed analysis of the annual performance of leading health and fitness clubs, including key performance metrics such as revenue and membership growth, payroll, member retention, non-dues revenue, and EBITDA. Profit center analysis as well as income statement and balance sheet data are also provided. 

Additional key findings include:  

  • Fitness-only clubs reported the greatest revenue growth across all segments by club type (+8.9%). 
  • Multipurpose clubs generated the greatest revenue per individual member ($810.80). 
  • Smaller clubs generated less revenue per individual member ($637.50) in comparison with larger clubs ($1,298.60), but achieved greater gross revenue growth (8.2% vs. 3.5%).
  • Total payroll claims a median 39% of total revenue for all responding clubs. 
  • Clubs reinvested roughly 3% of total revenue into fitness equipment.
Thursday
May122016

Will They Come? 4 Factors that Matter Most in Calculating Health Club Demand

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout.

Before you commit to opening, buying, or investing in a particular health club location, be sure you fully understand the four factors that matter most in calculating the local demand. They are:

1) Population Density. Health clubs thrive in markets where population density is highest. Sophisticated club operators like to site their facilities in markets where there are at least 60,000 and preferably 100,000+ people who are in close proximity to the facility. (Mini-facilities can succeed in smaller markets.)

2) Travel Time. In suburban markets, in which the car is the primary means of commuting to a club, the primary trading area for clubs in competitive markets extends no more than eight minutes for the primary market, 12 minutes for the secondary market of travel time from the club site.

Note that the reference is to travel time, and not to miles or distance. In every market, these two factors are distinct. Note, also, that this implies 12 minutes from either a person’s residence or from his or her office. Numerous health club demographic studies show that upwards of 80% of a club’s members come from within 12 minutes travel time of the facility. Travel should mimic the realistic route used by a local resident to the club site.

Travel times need to be calculated at prime time; that is, at times of peak demand such as between 6 and 8 a.m. or between 4:30 and 7:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday. In most suburban markets, 10-12 minutes travel time means no more than three or four miles from the club site, and it can be as limited as under two miles in dense areas.

In most situations, at least 70% to 80% of a club’s members need to come from within this primary trading area.

In urban markets, where parking space is limited and car travel is constricted, the primary trading area for a club generally extends no further than an eight-minute walk/commute for the primary market and a 12-minute walk/commute for the secondary area from the proposed site.

Because all markets tend to become competitive over time, travel time benchmarks need to be applied even if the market is not yet competitive.

Trading areas need to be plotted precisely. Each intersection point needs to be connected. That polygon is what should determine the primary, secondary, and total markets. Once a club’s trading area is determined, various demographic services can provide essential information, such as: the number of people that live or work within a particular primary trading area, their ages, their marital status and whether they have children, their educational attainment level, their median household incomes, the level of professional/ management occupations, home ownership, etc.

3) Household Income. There is a strong correlation between median household income and health club membership. Whereas roughly one out of five members of the American population is a health club member, member penetration rates among high-income segments often approaches 30%.

Conversely, when household income falls below $25,000, only one out of every 14 (7.2%) people is a health club member.

Household income is also a key determinant of club pricing. In general, in markets where the average household income is $75,000 or more, such a community can support dues pricing in the $60 to $125 range. (Naturally, it can also support clubs with lower dues structures.)

Where the average household income is $50,000 to $75,000, the market will support dues pricing in the $45 to $74 range. And where household income is in the $20,000 to $50,000 range, the market will support monthly dues pricing in the $10 to $44 range. In the last 10 years, the widespread availability of low-priced options has exerted significant downward pressure on health club pricing in many markets.

4) Educational Attainment. Educational attainment levels are another key factor in assessing demand. In general, the higher the educational attainment level of people in the community, the higher will be the overall market penetration rates of the clubs serving that market.

To cite but a few examples: the overall health club penetration rate among full-time college students is 24%; the health club penetration rate among men and women with advanced degrees (business degrees, law degrees, medicine, etc.) is 25.2%. Conversely, among men, who earn $75,000 or more, but who did not go to college, the penetration rate is 11.6%

Because of the complexity of assessing demand in any community, it is essential that feasibility studies be conducted by experienced third parties who are not developers, architects, or builders.

This post was excerpted from the IHRSA Health Club Business Handbook, written by John McCarthy and sponsored by ABC Financial.

Monday
May092016

IHRSA Report: Men and Women Now Equally Likely to Join Health Clubs

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout. 

The health club member gender gap closed in 2014 as males and females were equally likely to be join a gym, according to IHRSA’s 2015 Health Club Consumer Report: The Story Behind Members and Their Health & Fitness Clubs

While males are more likely to belong to commercial multipurpose and boot camp facilities, females are more likely to belong to yoga/Pilates/barre and residential centers. Men and women are nearly equally represented in nonprofit and combat-focused facilities (boxing/mixed martial arts/MMA). 

The Health Club Consumer Report is an annual publication that provides demographics and participation data on American health club consumers. New to the 2015 edition was an in-depth review of activity preferences by gender, consumer trend analysis of generational and ethnic groups, and multi-year analyses of membership trends by club type. 

“U.S. health club participation has reached an all-time high of 63 million total consumers, including 54.1 million members and 9.3 million non-member club users; showing that the many different club types are meeting consumers needs to get active, pursue their athletic goals, and maintain wellness,” said Jay Ablondi, IHRSA’s executive vice president of global products. “Last year, a large percentage of studio members indicated that they were enrolled at more than one facility in order to pursue their fitness goals. Specifically, 64-79% of small group training studio participants, and 86-91% of boot camp/cross training and boxing/MMA members, reported working out at more than one club.” 

More than 63 million Americans used a health club or studio in 2014, including 9.3 million non-members. Members utilized the health club for an average of 102 days. Males were slightly more likely to frequent their clubs more often than females as males visited their health clubs for an average of 104 days in 2014, in comparison with females, who utilized their clubs for 100 days. 

The 2015 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report also covers the following topics: 

Macro Health Club Membership Trends: an examination of club membership growth and the industry landscape; 

The Health/Fitness Club Value Equation: insights on the relationship of dues to the consumer price index, the member and club value equation, and the future of the industry from a price-value perspective; 

Member Behavior: insights on membership tenure, attendance, and activity participation across demographics; 

Member Demographics and the Impact on the Industry: an exploration of gender, household, ethnicity, and educational demographics as well as how national demographics are influencing the health club industry; 

Personal Training: an analysis of personal training users and spending; 

Overarching Insights & Takeaways for Health Club Operators: a summary of the opportunities for health club owners, operators and staff, to include marketing and programming options.

Now through June 30, use promo code 2016SALE to save 25% on the Health Club Business Handbook and all other resources in the IHRSA Store!

Monday
May022016

Why the Health Club Business Handbook is the Ultimate Investor and Operator Guide

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout. 

IHRSA’s Health Club Business Handbook: The Ultimate Investor and Operator Guide to Gyms, Studios and Fitness Centers (HCBH), is a resource aimed at helping existing and potential club owners, managers, and investors understand the key factors that affect the success of a health club company. 

The ABC Financial-sponsored publication is organized into 11 sections, each featuring charts and graphics from industry research or from the private collection that author John McCarthy, retired former executive director of IHRSA, has gathered over the course of his career. Sections include: 

  • The Health Club Industry at a Glance - a summary of industry growth, consumer demographics, public companies, and the largest franchises in the U.S.;
  • Facilitating Industry Growth - an exploration of demand and supply drivers, market readiness, and financing options;
  • Evaluating a Loan or Investment Proposal - an examination of factors to consider when developing or investing in a health club, including start-up costs and operating capital, success factors, and return on invested capital;
  • Formula and Measures - an analysis of key performance indicators and recommended guidelines;
  • Industry Prognosis: The Next 10 Years - an in-depth overview of economic, legislative, consumer, and related factors that impact the future of the industry.  

“The IHRSA Health Club Business Handbook provides club owners with critical information needed to understand the operational considerations and market conditions that can make or break their businesses," said Jay Ablondi, IHRSA’s executive vice president of global products. “It also provides lenders, investors, venture capitalists, and others with the financial performance indicators, consumer demographics data, and industry overview that will help them properly evaluate a club investment."

Now through June 30, use promo code 2016SALE to save 25% on the Health Club Business Handbook and all other resources in the IHRSA Store!

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Tuesday
Jun162015

Spring Sale’s Featured Publication: The 2015 IHRSA Asia-Pacific Health Club Report

Sponsored by Precor and produced in cooperation with Deloitte China, this research publication focuses on the health club industry in 13 markets in the Asia-Pacific region, containing profiles of leading club companies as well as analyses of the competitive landscape, fitness trends, and an economic overview for all markets observed.

“This report is the most comprehensive examination of the Asia-Pacific health club industry available anywhere,” said Jay Ablondi, IHRSA’s executive vice president of global products. “The report is the ultimate reference on the industry in the Asia Pacific for club operators, developers, analysts, and lenders and investors.”

Thirteen markets in the Asia-Pacific region combine to serve 17 million members at more than 28,000 health clubs. Total revenues for the region are an estimated US$14.3 billion. The report shows room for growth as the average market penetration rate for the region is 3.8%. Australia and New Zealand lead all Asia-Pacific markets in penetration rate at 14.8% and 11.4%, respectively.

“Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan and some large cities, including Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia, Jakarta in Indonesia, Beijing and Shanghai in China, belong to maturing fitness industries with gradually professionalizing players and maturing consumers,” said Alan MacCharles, partner at Deloitte China. “However, health club industries in the remaining Asian markets observed are still in a comparatively early stage due to economic development and awareness factors, and robust future growth can be expected.”

The IHRSA Asia-Pacific Health Club Report is divided into the following sections:

  • Asia-Pacific Market Overview – this section summarizes topline statistics, including club count, number of memberships, market size, penetration rates, and market potential per market;
  • Market Reports – this part contains an in-depth examination of markets in the Asia-Pacific region, including Australia, China, Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Hong Kong, Taiwan, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand;
  • Appendix – for more details on sources consulted, definitions & abbreviations, and exchange rates applied, refer to this section;
  • Company Profiles – this section provides a snapshot of leading club companies in the Asia-Pacific region. 

Purchase The 2015 IHRSA Asia-Pacific Health Club Report


Friday
Jun122015

Spring Sale’s Featured Publication: Staff Training Videos

Looking to train your staff in all aspects of sales, service, and marketing? IHRSA's Professional Development and Management videos make it easy and cost-effective to do so at one’s leisure. Titles include:

SALES

  •  Selling Club Memberships (with Karen Woodward)
  •  Managing the Sales Team and Process (with Bill McBride)
  •  Selling Club Services to Corporations (with Bill McBride)
  •  Non-Sales Professional's Guide to Selling Club Services and Products (with Stephen Tharrett)

MEMBER SERVICE / RETENTION

  • Engaging New Members in the Club (with Brent Darden)
  • Creating a Warm and Welcoming Club Environment (with Brent Darden)
  • Creating and Sustaining a Member-Service Culture (with Herb Lipsman)
  • Increasing Membership Retention in the Health and Fitness Industry (with Bill McBride)

MARKETING

  • Establishing a Powerful Online Presence (with Bill McBride)
  • Branding: Establishing a Promise That Engages the Emotions (with Stephen Tharrett)
  • Marketing: Communicating Your Brand’s Value Proposition (with Stephen Tharrett)
  • Digital Marketing (with Guy Dineen)

These 12 videos are available in a variety of formats, including DVD, streaming video, and digital download.

See all titles.

SAVE! The IHRSA Store's Spring Sale runs through June 30, 2015, at ihrsa.org/store. Enter the promo code SPRING2015FS at checkout and save 15% when you spend $50. You will also receive free shipping to the continental United States, if applicable. Questions? Contact store@ihrsa.org.