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Entries in Health Club Consumer Report (7)

Thursday
Sep282017

3 Ways Youth Are Shaping the Health Club Market 

In 2016, health club membership grew by 3.6% from 2015, while the total number of users, including members and non-members, rose by 3.1%, according to IHRSA’s recently released 2017 Health Club Consumer Report.

Photo: The Atlantic Club

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Monday
Sep122016

U.S. Health Club Membership Reached High of 55.3 Million in 2015

Membership in U.S. health clubs reached an all-time high of 55.3 million in 2015, representing an annual growth rate of 3.3% over the past three years, according to the newly released IHRSA 2016 Health Club Consumer Report

The annual publication, which is based on a nationwide sample of more than 32,000 interviews, also found that another 9.1 million non-members exercised at clubs in 2015, bringing the total number of Americans utilizing health clubs to 64.4 million—also a record high. 

Exercise Habits of Millennials, Generation X and Boomers 

Health club usage and activity preferences vary widely across generational groups, a finding which club operators can consider in strategic positioning and program development.

Generation X is more likely to utilize resistance machines and treadmills, while Millennials are more likely to participate in yoga and cross-training programs. Boomers are more inclined to engage in Tai Chi and aquatic exercise. 

“As the Consumer Report bears out, distinctions in activity participation impact club preferences among consumers,” said Melissa Rodriguez, IHRSA’s senior research manager. “While Millennials opt for studios to engage in specific training formats, Generation X’ers are more likely to use fitness-only and multipurpose clubs for access to various training equipment.” 

About the 2016 Health Club Consumer Report 

Through several club applications, the 2016 Health Club Consumer Report guides club operators in leveraging such demographic trends in efforts to stand out from the competition. 

Owners of full-service health clubs may consider cultivating an offer that emphasizes group training and building a strong online presence in order to engage Millennials. Club operators who aim to target Boomers may not only offer relevant exercise programs, but also provide stellar in-person customer service and foster ongoing interactions with club staff.

Tuesday
Sep062016

From WiFi to Community: What Millennials Want From Their Health Club

What’s next on the horizon for the health and fitness industry?
A revolution sparked by millennials, suggests Stephen Tharrett, the cofounder and principal of ClubIntel, an industry consultancy based in Highland Village, TX.

“Millennials—those individuals who were born between 1980 and 2000—are poised to dramatically change the industry, as they’re introducing a whole new purchasing mindset,” he says in the September issue of Club Business International. “Club operators are well advised to take note.”

 

The new issue of the IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report, produced by IHRSA and ClubIntel, supports Tharrett’s assertion. This annual best-selling research publication provides detailed information on participation trends among both health club member and nonmember consumers at U.S. fitness facilities.

The report identifies numerous new opportunities for club operators, but the one that shines brightest—because of the large size of the group and the small size of the current penetration rate—is the one offered by millennials.

Clearly, this group represents a promising, largely untapped market for the industry, prompting operators, equipment suppliers, and marketers to pose the question: “Who, exactly, are the millennials, and what do they want?”

Free WiFi and Intelligent Exercise Equipment

“Technology,” is the first word out of Dan Schawbel’s mouth when he’s asked what attracts millennials to a club. Schawbel is the founder and managing partner of Millennial Branding, a Boston-based research firm, and a New York Times best-selling author.

“They want free WiFi wherever they are. They’re the most connected generation in history,” he says. “So clubs should focus on having modern equipment, a strong online network, and a solid social media presence.”

The affinity these individuals have for technology is hardly surprising, since they were born and grew up with it. The Internet, smartphones, and social media have been an integral part of their daily lives.

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Monday
May232016

Personal Training Usage Continues to Grow Among Health Club Members

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout. 

Personal training is often the second-largest source of revenue for many health clubs and, in the case of many studios, it’s their primary source of revenue.

IHRSA’s Profiles of Success notes that leading club operators generate a median of 10% of total revenues from personal training. Incremental membership growth over the past several years has motivated club operators to seek new revenue sources and, consequently, the emphasis on monetizing the member experience through personal training (individual and small group). This year’s findings offer a window into the world of personal training to identify behaviors and trends that might help club operators prosper.

Personal Training Usage Moves Upward in 2014

In 2014, 15% of health club members and 15.4% of non-member users engaged in at least one personal training session. This represents an 11% increase over 2013, when 13.5% of members took part in at least one personal training session.

Among the 15% of members who have taken at least one personal training session over the past year, men are more likely to participate than women, with 16% of men and 14% of women engaging in personal training at least once in the past year, both increases from 2013. Among non-members, where overall participation was 15.4%, men and women were equally likely to engage in personal training.

Key distinctions in personal training participation can be observed across the various industry segments. The penetration percentage for members using personal training at least once in 2014 for traditional clubs ranges from 15% in nonprofits to 28% in multipurpose clubs, while for studio segments it ranges from 28% to 57%. It should be noted that the high levels of personal training participation for many of these studio facilities could be attributed to their heavy reliance on small group training.

In 2014, personal training clients worked with a trainer an average of 25 times over the course of the year, with women using the services of a trainer for an average of 32 times, in comparison with 20 sessions for men. The majority of members engage in personal training less than 10 times annually, with 59% of personal training clients using a personal trainer fewer than 10 times annually. On the other end of the spectrum, 15% of members engage with a trainer at least 50 times a year (super consumers) and women are nearly twice as likely to be a super consumer as men.

Personal Training Demographics – The Influence of Age and Income

Adults ages 25 to 34, along with youth 6 to 12, were the most likely to engage in personal training. Adults between the ages 35 and 44 closely followed these two younger age groups with 19% of personal training clients derived from this audience.

It’s worth noting that adults over age 55 are the least likely to leverage the expertise of a personal trainer, with fewer than 10% doing so. Viewing personal training trends by age group as a percentage of the overall membership, rather than just as a percentage of a specific age group, reveals that 6- to 12-year-olds, 25- to 34-year-olds, and 35- to 44-year-olds each represent 3% of the total membership base.

Personal training has proven to be the domain of the more affluent; 7% of members earning in excess of $100,000 annually engage in personal training—more than twice the percentage of any other HHI group that engages in personal training. No other HHI group has more than 2.4% of its membership group involved in personal training.

Finally, nearly 8% of all personal training clients are Caucasian health club members (over 50% of all personal training clients). Hispanic members are the second largest segment of personal training clients, representing 3.5% of all members (17% of all personal training clients). 

This post was excerpted from the 2015 Health Club Consumer Report.

Monday
May092016

IHRSA Report: Men and Women Now Equally Likely to Join Health Clubs

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout. 

The health club member gender gap closed in 2014 as males and females were equally likely to be join a gym, according to IHRSA’s 2015 Health Club Consumer Report: The Story Behind Members and Their Health & Fitness Clubs

While males are more likely to belong to commercial multipurpose and boot camp facilities, females are more likely to belong to yoga/Pilates/barre and residential centers. Men and women are nearly equally represented in nonprofit and combat-focused facilities (boxing/mixed martial arts/MMA). 

The Health Club Consumer Report is an annual publication that provides demographics and participation data on American health club consumers. New to the 2015 edition was an in-depth review of activity preferences by gender, consumer trend analysis of generational and ethnic groups, and multi-year analyses of membership trends by club type. 

“U.S. health club participation has reached an all-time high of 63 million total consumers, including 54.1 million members and 9.3 million non-member club users; showing that the many different club types are meeting consumers needs to get active, pursue their athletic goals, and maintain wellness,” said Jay Ablondi, IHRSA’s executive vice president of global products. “Last year, a large percentage of studio members indicated that they were enrolled at more than one facility in order to pursue their fitness goals. Specifically, 64-79% of small group training studio participants, and 86-91% of boot camp/cross training and boxing/MMA members, reported working out at more than one club.” 

More than 63 million Americans used a health club or studio in 2014, including 9.3 million non-members. Members utilized the health club for an average of 102 days. Males were slightly more likely to frequent their clubs more often than females as males visited their health clubs for an average of 104 days in 2014, in comparison with females, who utilized their clubs for 100 days. 

The 2015 IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report also covers the following topics: 

Macro Health Club Membership Trends: an examination of club membership growth and the industry landscape; 

The Health/Fitness Club Value Equation: insights on the relationship of dues to the consumer price index, the member and club value equation, and the future of the industry from a price-value perspective; 

Member Behavior: insights on membership tenure, attendance, and activity participation across demographics; 

Member Demographics and the Impact on the Industry: an exploration of gender, household, ethnicity, and educational demographics as well as how national demographics are influencing the health club industry; 

Personal Training: an analysis of personal training users and spending; 

Overarching Insights & Takeaways for Health Club Operators: a summary of the opportunities for health club owners, operators and staff, to include marketing and programming options.

Now through June 30, use promo code 2016SALE to save 25% on the Health Club Business Handbook and all other resources in the IHRSA Store!

Tuesday
Mar082016

IHRSA Report: Record 64.3 Million Americans Use Health Clubs

When trying to get a sense of the state of our industry, it’s wise to follow the trend lines—in particular, the health club usage trends that have emerged in the United States over the past seven years.

  1. Healthy Growth. The number of health club consumers has grown by 24% since 2009, topping 64.3 million Americans. Put another way, that’s one in five Americans ages six and up. The number of health club members has grown by 22%, exceeding 55.2 million Americans in 2015.
  2. Usage is Up. The percentage of active members—that is, those using the club on a regular basis—has grown by 23% over the past seven years, surpassing 49.7 million in 2015. Nearly half of all members use their health club at least 100 days per year, while the average annual attendance for all health club members was 104 days in 2015. 
  3. We’re Talking Billions. Another sign that health clubs are an integral part of people’s lives: the number of U.S. club visits has increased by 25% since 2009. Last year, America’s health clubs serviced 5,418,023,170 visits!
  4. Look Who’s Talking: No, not the baby voiced by Bruce Willis in the 1989 film by the same name, but rather the 8.2 million health club members under the age of 18. The growth rate for this youth segment in health clubs is the greatest by far of any age cohort, increasing by 78.7% since 2009.
  5. Who You Calling "Senior"? Active Americans age 55 and older at health clubs also saw impressive growth since 2009, increasing by 35% to 13.9 million in 2015. The growth rate for those over 65 was also 35% over the same period.
  6. Mind the Millennials. This group comprises one-third of the American workforce, and will soon become the majority as they come of age. Estimated at 80 million, they outnumber Baby Boomers (73 million) and Generation X (49 million). While the 14 million Millennial health club members are a force to be reckoned with, it is interesting to note that the 18-34 age segment at health clubs grew by only 1.7% over the past seven years.
  7. Gen X Marks the Spot. The 35-54 age cohort at health clubs is still the biggest, clocking in at 19 million Americans last year. The numbers of Generation Xers and the younger side of the Boomer Generation have grown by 15% since 2009.

The trend lines are clear. The question is: where do we go from here? One resource to consult is The IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report. It offers detailed participation rates of both members and non-members and contains many ideas for engaging new and existing customers. To learn more, visit ihrsa.org/research-reports.

Wednesday
Sep302015

IHRSA Releases 2015 Health Club Consumer Report

IHRSA recently released the 2015 Health Club Consumer Report: The Story Behind Members and Their Health & Fitness Clubs. This annual publication provides demographics and participation data on American health club consumers.  

“U.S. health club participation has reached an all-time high of 63 million total consumers, including 54.1 million members and 9.3 million non-member club users;  showing that the many different club types are meeting consumers needs to get active, pursue their athletic goals, and maintain wellness,” said Jay Ablondi, IHRSA’s executive vice president of global products. “Last year, a large percentage of studio members indicated that they were enrolled at more than one facility in order to pursue their fitness goals. Specifically, 64-79% of small group training studio participants, and 86-91% of boot camp/cross training and boxing/MMA members, reported working out at more than one club.”

More than 63 million Americans used a health club or studio in 2014, including 9.3 millions non-members. Members utilized the health club for an average of 102 days.

The average membership tenure indicated by respondents was 4.9 years in 2014. However, membership duration varies across club segments as multipurpose club members remain members longer than studio segments. On average, multipurpose club members belong to their clubs for an average of 6.3 years, while membership tenure for studio members range between 4.4 and 5.1 years.

To learn more about the new IHRSA Health Club Consumer Report, visit ihrsa.org/consumer-report.