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Entries in employee benefits (9)

Wednesday
May032017

Employee Benefits: How Does Your Health Club Compare to the Competition?

Could you use some guidance when it comes to compensating your health club’s employees? If so, you’re not alone. The IHRSA Health Club Employee Compensation & Benefits Report, published in March 2017, can help you compare your club to the competition in terms of hourly pay, annual salaries, and employee benefits. 

The report is based on survey data provided by leading IHRSA member health clubs in the U.S. and Canada, and provides compensation information for senior management/corporate staff, salaried club-level employees, and hourly club-level employees. Salary information for select job titles is provided by geographical region, company type, and size in number of units and total annual sales. The report also provides a brief macroeconomic outlook on compensation and unemployment. 

Continue reading "Employee Benefits: How Does Your Health Club Compare to the Competition?"

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Jan112017

13 Unique Employee Benefits Offered by Top Companies 

by Regina Satagaj, vice president of human resources for IHRSA 

Last month I shared some strategies to help you determine the needs of your health club staff by gathering employee feedback. Now let’s look at some of the benefits you can offer to meet those needs, based on employee perks provided by top companies.

Research from Glassdoor found that more than half of employees say benefits and perks are a top consideration in accepting a position, and four out five workers say they would prefer new benefits over a pay raise. 

These are the top five benefits ranked by employees: 

  • Healthcare insurance
  • Vacation/paid time off
  • Performance bonus
  • Paid sick days
  • 401K plan, retirement plan and/or pension 

Where does the health club industry rank? The IHRSA Health Club Employee Compensation & Benefits Report states that the industry stacks up pretty well in offering most of the top five benefits.

But in addition to understanding and meeting employees’ basic needs or offering the top ranked benefits, what are leading companies doing to attract and retain employees?

Continue reading "13 Unique Employee Benefits Offered by Top Companies."

Click to read more ...

Monday
Jun132016

9 Health Club Employee Benefits Trends 

This feature is brought to you by the IHRSA Store spring sale. Now through June 30, save 25% on reports, webinars, and all other resources in the IHRSA Store by using promo code 2016SALE at checkout. 

The 2015 IHRSA Employee Compensation & Benefits Report contains the most complete, accurate, and up-to-date compensation data in the club industry.

The report is designed to allow a company to easily compare its compensation levels for approximately 50 common job titles in the industry. These job titles include positions in senior management, salaried club-level employees, and hourly club-level employees.

In addition to compensation information, responding companies provided data on employee benefits offered, health insurance practices, retirement plans, vacation, and sick leave. 

The latest report identified nine employee benefits trends for health clubs.  

  1. Most responding companies provide medical insurance to their salaried employees (98%) and hourly employees (71%). On average, companies pay 71% of the premium for salaried club-level employees and 63% of the premium for hourly club-level employees.
  2. Approximately 46% also provide medical insurance to dependents. On average, companies pay for 29% of the family coverage premium for salaried club-level employees and 26% of the family coverage premium for hourly club-level employees.
  3. Of those providing health insurance, the most popular types are PPO (26%), HMO (26%), and high deductible/HSA plans (23%).
  4. On average, responding companies experienced a 4.9% increase in health care premiums from 2013 to 2014.
  5. Nearly 80% of the responding companies offer a retirement plan to employees. Of those companies, a 401(k) plan is 
clearly the most popular type of plan (86% offer one).
  6. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents match employee contributions to the 401(k) plan.
  7. The average number of paid leave days offered to salaried employees ranges from ten for employees with less than one year on the job to 24 days for salaried employees with over ten years tenure.
  8. The average number of paid leave days offered to hourly employees ranges from seven for employees with less than one year on the job to 19 for hourly employees with over ten years tenure.
  9. One-third of the responding companies allow unused vacation to carry over to the next year. Fewer (17%) allow employees to receive compensation for unused sick days. 

This post was excerpted from The 2015 IHRSA Employee Compensation & Benefits Report.

Monday
Feb022015

See How Your Club Compares, with IHRSA's Compensation & Benefits Report

IHRSA has been publishing a compensation and benefits report for more than a decade. In that time, jobs, job titles and, of course, compensation and benefits have changed dramatically.

The 2015 IHRSA Health Club Employee Compensation & Benefits Report, which was released today, has added new titles like Social Media Specialists, Barre instructor, Dietician, and Nutrition director, among others.

The report is able to be tabulated and calculated thanks to IHRSA member health club managers or owners voluntarily filling out a survey that asks for compensation information for all levels of employees - management, salaried and hourly management and staff. This year more than 300 clubs participated.

The report is published every two years. The 2015 report shows how strong the economy is and how it has affected the health and fitness industry.

“Since the last report, published in 2013, the economy and employment levels have continued to expand, which bodes well for the health club industry,” said Melissa Rodriguez, IHRSA’s senior research manager. “Thanks to an improving economy, club operators can consider increasing their budget for payroll by rewarding stellar employees, adding monetary incentives for existing staff, or investing in new employees to assist with delivering in-demand club programs.”

The 2015 IHRSA Health Club Employee Compensation & Benefits Report is divided into three parts:

  • Part 1: Senior Management / Corporate Staff
  • Part 2: Salaried Club-Level Employees
  • Part 3: Hourly Club-Level Employees

The 2015 IHRSA Health Club Employee Compensation & Benefits Report is available as a PDF at ihrsa.org/compensation-report, either in full for $399.95 ($199.95 for IHRSA members) or in three separate parts for $149.95 each ($79.95 each for IHRSA members).

Thursday
Feb212013

Compensation and benefits report now available

In addition to more than 100 North American clubs’ salary and information data – a great way to monitor your numbers to comparable facilities – and information on 50 different job titles, new this year to the IHRSA 2013 Employee Compensation & Benefits Report is a breakdown by type of club. The new feature will also allow for comparisons of similar clubs, with the following filters: Independent, Part of a chain, Franchise, Fitness-only, and Multipurpose. 

The report is now available. It is an amazing resource for all managers and owners.

For more, click here.

Thursday
Nov152012

Compensation and benefits survey deadline is Nov. 16

A friendly reminder that the deadline to take part in IHRSA's Employee Compensation & Benefits Survey is tomorrow, Friday, Nov. 16.


"The IHRSA Employee Compensation & Benefits Survey gathers compensation data beyond just pay for personal trainers, group exercise instructors, and other fitness professionals," said Melissa Rodriguez, IHRSA's senior research manager. "Compensation and benefits information is measured for salaried corporate and club-level employees, as well as hourly-level support staff, all of which play an important role in the strategic and day-to-day operations of a health club company."


Participating clubs will receive a complimentary PDF of The IHRSA 2013 Employee Compensation & Benefits Report. This report is derived from the most comprehensive study of employee compensation practices among North American clubs.

Go to IHRSA's Research page to learn more.

 

 

Friday
Oct262012

Compensation & Benefits Survey data being collected

Do you wonder if you are paying your staff enough? Do you worry that you are not in line with similar-sized facilities when it comes to benefits? Do you think poor pay and benefits could be the reason you have a high turnover rate for your staff?

IHRSA is in the process of gathering data for the 2013 Employee Compensation & Benefits Report. The data could not only help you get your benefits package on par with your business peers, but we are asking member clubs to participate, whcih could assist your colleagues with your club's informaiton.

Check out how to participate, or to get last year's report, here.

Monday
Aug302010

Pay Structure

Keith Callahan, Richard Synnott and Brad Wilkins discuss the industry standard when it comes to providing health care for employees:

Q: “What is the industry standard when it comes to paying employees health insurance?”

A: Check two things:

  1. What does your state require you to do? Fortunately, most do not have any minimum employer contribution requirements.
  2. What does your insurance company require for a minimum employer contribution? Most insurance companies request/require employers to contribute at least 50% of the cost.

It is realistic to expect your company to pay 55% to 75% of the health insurance coverage. The more you contribute, the greater your direct cost – and the more likely you are to have your employees add their spouses. It is common in many companies to have a spousal penalty cost to encourage couples to separate their insurance and purchase directly from their own employer when possible. If the spouse is not employed, the penalty does not apply.

As an option, consider moving to a high deductible plan and creating a Heath Reimbursement Account, which the company would contribute anything up to 100% toward the high deductibles. You can often find that the premium savings outweigh the cost of paying your employees deductibles.

You will need a third party to administer this HRA program for you due to HIPPA rules. And finally, hire a broker and have them shop three or four carriers to get a reasonably competitive cost.

Keith Callahan, G.M. / Managing Partner
Manchester Athletic Club
kcallahan@blueskycorp.com

A: I don’t know if there is a “standard” across the board.

10-12 years ago we paid 100% medical insurance for our managers and 50% for all other employees who work full time. As the Massachusetts and federal laws have changed, and insurance has gone up with double-digit increases, we have had to adapt. We currently pay about 35%. Some of this has been due to the Mass law that makes it mandatory for everyone to have insurance. Most of the costs for this have been passed to the small businesses.

We would have had a 34% increase in our premium this past year, so we had to drop down to a more basic plan. It’s the 3rd year in a row that we have had to reduce benefits and pass some of the costs on to the employees.

Richard Synnott, Executive Director
Weymouth Club
ed@weymouthclub.com
www.weymouthclub.com

A: The first thing to realize is the complexity of our industry. We have for-profit businesses, non-profit businesses, publicly traded companies, “mom-and-pop shops”, and hospital based businesses just to name a few.

The second thing to realize is that in the United States, the Department of Labor (http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos296.htm) estimates that there are approximately 265,000 fitness professionals working in the industry; and of this group about half are either part-time employees or contract labor.

I mention these two things to show the dynamics of our employers; because the answer to your question depends on what sector of the industry you work, and how the employer-employee relationship is defined (1099/contract vs. W-2). Thus, I must answer your question carefully and to highlight the fact that the below information are industry averages as we see them and would be highly sensitive to industry specifics:

  1. Employee coverage: employers typically cover between 70% - 90% of the single coverage when the employee is a full time W-2 employee
  2. Family coverage: the vast majority of employers offer family coverage to employees, but sometimes at a more substantial cost than single employee coverage. Employer averages are roughly 20% - 40% of dependant/family coverage for full time W-2 employees
  3. Overall, the employee can expect to have health care coverage offered through their employer, provided that they are full time and employed as a W-2 employee. The cost and substance of the health coverage, however, will vary significantly depending on industry, employer size and state insurance regulations.

Lastly, it is important mention, with the current administration in place and healthcare reform on the way, healthcare as we know it is probably going to change.

Brad Wilkins, Vice President & General Mgr.
Cooper Fitness Center
bwilkins@cooperfitnesscenter.com
www.cooperfitnesscenter.com

Monday
Aug092010

Employee Benefits

Q: “What is the industry standard when it comes to paying employees health insurance?”

A: Check two things:

  1. What does your state require you to do? Fortunately, most do not have any minimum employer contribution requirements.
  2. What does your insurance company require for a minimum employer contribution? Most insurance companies request/require employers to contribute at least 50% of the cost.

It is realistic to expect your company to pay 55% to 75% of the health insurance coverage. The more you contribute, the greater your direct cost – and the more likely you are to have your employees add their spouses. It is common in many companies to have a spousal penalty cost to encourage couples to separate their insurance and purchase directly from their own employer when possible. If the spouse is not employed, the penalty does not apply.

As an option, consider moving to a high deductible plan and creating a Heath Reimbursement Account, which the company would contribute anything up to 100% toward the high deductibles. You can often find that the premium savings outweigh the cost of paying your employees deductibles.

You will need a third party to administer this HRA program for you due to HIPPA rules. And finally, hire a broker and have them shop three or four carriers to get a reasonably competitive cost.

Keith Callahan, G.M. / Managing Partner
Manchester Athletic Club
kcallahan@blueskycorp.com

A: I don’t know if there is a “standard” across the board.

10-12 years ago we paid 100% medical insurance for our managers and 50% for all other employees who work full time. As the Massachusetts and federal laws have changed, and insurance has gone up with double-digit increases, we have had to adapt. We currently pay about 35%. Some of this has been due to the Mass law that makes it mandatory for everyone to have insurance. Most of the costs for this have been passed to the small businesses.

We would have had a 34% increase in our premium this past year, so we had to drop down to a more basic plan. It’s the 3rd year in a row that we have had to reduce benefits and pass some of the costs on to the employees.

Richard Synnott, Executive Director
Weymouth Club
ed@weymouthclub.com
www.weymouthclub.com

A: The first thing to realize is the complexity of our industry. We have for-profit businesses, non-profit businesses, publicly traded companies, “mom-and-pop shops”, and hospital based businesses just to name a few.

The second thing to realize is that in the United States, the Department of Labor (http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos296.htm) estimates that there are approximately 265,000 fitness professionals working in the industry; and of this group about half are either part-time employees or contract labor.

I mention these two things to show the dynamics of our employers; because the answer to your question depends on what sector of the industry you work, and how the employer-employee relationship is defined (1099/contract vs. W-2). Thus, I must answer your question carefully and to highlight the fact that the below information are industry averages as we see them and would be highly sensitive to industry specifics:

  1. Employee coverage: employers typically cover between 70% - 90% of the single coverage when the employee is a full time W-2 employee
  2. Family coverage: the vast majority of employers offer family coverage to employees, but sometimes at a more substantial cost than single employee coverage. Employer averages are roughly 20% - 40% of dependant/family coverage for full time W-2 employees
  3. Overall, the employee can expect to have health care coverage offered through their employer, provided that they are full time and employed as a W-2 employee. The cost and substance of the health coverage, however, will vary significantly depending on industry, employer size and state insurance regulations.

Lastly, it is important mention, with the current administration in place and healthcare reform on the way, healthcare as we know it is probably going to change.

Brad Wilkins, Vice President & General Mgr.
Cooper Fitness Center
bwilkins@cooperfitnesscenter.com
www.cooperfitnesscenter.com