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Entries in baby boomers (8)

Monday
Jul102017

How Gyms Can Cash in on Boomers' and Millennials' Purchasing Ideologies  

This post is a preview of the July 11 webinar, "Boomers and Millennials: Cashing in on their Distinct Purchasing Ideologies."

No doubt you've read an article, likely written by a baby boomer, detailing millennials' narcissism, tech-dependence, and other alleged shortcomings. But, despite these perceived differences, millennials and baby boomers actually have a lot in common when it comes to their purchasing ideologies.

Both groups, for instance, share a love for coupons, sales, and bargains. And both are comfortable with browsing, researching, and shopping online. Most importantly, baby boomers and millennials are now equally attractive demographics for health clubs, making it critical for club operators to rethink how they're engaging with both.

Continue reading "How Gyms Can Cash in on Boomers' and Millennials' Purchasing Ideologies."

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Mar282017

3 Keys to Successful Health Club Programming for Older Adults

Exercise is good for older adults—and older adults are good for your health club.

The global population is getting older—11.7% of the Earth’s population is over age 60, and this share is expected to grow to 21% by 2050. Fortunately for health clubs, older adults are more active than ever before, and the medical and public health communities are increasingly noting the mental and physical health benefits of remaining active into older age.

Older adults are one of the fastest growing membership groups—health club memberships climbed 72% among people older than 55 between 2005 and 2015. Many older adults are retired, so they have the time to join a health club. They can fill off-peak hours in the club, and tend to be some of the most loyal members.

Continue reading "3 Keys to Successful Health Club Programming for Older Adults."

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Monday
Nov212016

Boom or Bust? Get Baby Boomers Flocking to Your Gym

Globally, 11.7% of the world population is over age 60, and this share is expected to grow to 21% by 2050. There are currently 75 million Baby Boomers, making them one of the fastest growing membership groups.

When Boomers join a club, they are looking for a few key things: 

  • Prevention of future chronic disease
  • Control of any current chronic conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure
  • Reversal of aging’s negative effects
  • Full participation in life and in activities they enjoy

The latest evidence suggests that exercise is beneficial for adults of all ages, and a significant amount of research concludes that exercise can help to prevent, delay, and treat many diseases and conditions that affect individuals as they age.

Older adults are also good for your club—they are one of the fastest growing membership groups. This group has the time to join a health club, can fill off-peak hours in the club, and tend to be some of the most loyal members. Independence is a top priority for them, and physical activity in the social environment of a health club can help them maintain it.

Here are some tips for attracting—and keeping—boomers in your club.

Offer Classes that Meet Their Needs

One way to get the attention of older adults and attract them to your club is to offer group exercise classes that meet their specific, unique needs. The health and age of Boomers varies greatly, so try offering a wide range of classes. A few ideas include: 

1. Restorative or Modified Yoga

Yoga is great for stability, flexibility, and balance. Restorative yoga can help improve flexibility and strength, and chair yoga offers an alternative for people who are unable to get up and down from the floor to a traditional mat. Chair yoga is also a great way to include people who may be wheelchair bound.

2. Aquatic Aerobics

Water’s buoyancy creates less impact on bones and joints, making aquatic aerobics a good alternative for older adults with arthritis or sore joints, or people with bone and joint injuries, to get their 150 minutes of weekly moderate activity.

Continue reading "Boom or Bust? Get Baby Boomers Flocking to Your Gym."

Click to read more ...

Monday
Sep122016

U.S. Health Club Membership Reached High of 55.3 Million in 2015

Membership in U.S. health clubs reached an all-time high of 55.3 million in 2015, representing an annual growth rate of 3.3% over the past three years, according to the newly released IHRSA 2016 Health Club Consumer Report

The annual publication, which is based on a nationwide sample of more than 32,000 interviews, also found that another 9.1 million non-members exercised at clubs in 2015, bringing the total number of Americans utilizing health clubs to 64.4 million—also a record high. 

Exercise Habits of Millennials, Generation X and Boomers 

Health club usage and activity preferences vary widely across generational groups, a finding which club operators can consider in strategic positioning and program development.

Generation X is more likely to utilize resistance machines and treadmills, while Millennials are more likely to participate in yoga and cross-training programs. Boomers are more inclined to engage in Tai Chi and aquatic exercise. 

“As the Consumer Report bears out, distinctions in activity participation impact club preferences among consumers,” said Melissa Rodriguez, IHRSA’s senior research manager. “While Millennials opt for studios to engage in specific training formats, Generation X’ers are more likely to use fitness-only and multipurpose clubs for access to various training equipment.” 

About the 2016 Health Club Consumer Report 

Through several club applications, the 2016 Health Club Consumer Report guides club operators in leveraging such demographic trends in efforts to stand out from the competition. 

Owners of full-service health clubs may consider cultivating an offer that emphasizes group training and building a strong online presence in order to engage Millennials. Club operators who aim to target Boomers may not only offer relevant exercise programs, but also provide stellar in-person customer service and foster ongoing interactions with club staff.

Thursday
Jul142016

Attract More Seniors to Your Health Club with IHRSA‚Äôs Latest E-book

It’s no surprise that older adults are one of the fastest growing membership groups—globally, 11.7% of the world population is over age 60, and this share is expected to grow to 21% by 2050. 

Aging involves a multitude of physical changes over time, which can reduce physical activity and negatively impact quality of life. 

The latest evidence suggests that exercise is beneficial for adults of all ages, and a significant amount of research concludes that exercise can help to prevent, delay, and treat many diseases and conditions that affect individuals as they age. 

This group has the time and money to join a health club, can fill off-peak hours in the club, and tend to be some of the most loyal members. Independence is a top priority for them, and physical activity in the social environment of a health club can help them maintain it.  

Despite the benefits of exercise, many seniors face barriers to exercising in a health club. These can include: 

  • Concerns about injury
  • Co-existing chronic conditions
  • Wariness of starting something new
  • Feeling intimidated by younger, fitter people at the gym
  • Limited independence or lack of transportation  

The July edition of the “12 Months of Health Promotion” e-book provides tips, program ideas, and resources to help your club attract and retain members over age 55, including:  

  • 7 great class ideas for older adults
  • What baby boomers are looking for in a health club
  • 3 key points to success for senior fitness
  • Revenue-generating ideas for seniors
  • Social media-related blog posts to read and share    

“12 Months of Health Promotion” is a monthly series of e-books that will provide information, resources, and ideas to help you capitalize on the communication opportunities available to you in the U.S. and around the world. Look for a new issue at the beginning of each month.

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Tuesday
Oct012013

IHRSA Webinar: Servicing the health needs for older adults

It is no secret that the largest population, or the fastest growing, in many countries is the older generation - those who have retired or are nearing that time, usually in their 60s, 70s and 80s.

It certainly is not an age group that most clubs cater to. The large majority do not want to be at a club, and as far as retention goes, they are less likely to be longtime members.

Maureen Hagan is an expert in the area of programming for older adults. She is leading the next IHRSA Webinar, sponsored by Cybex, “Booming Opportunity: Servicing the Health & Fitness Needs of Older Adults,” on Thursday, Oct. 10, 2:30 to 4 p.m.

Read on for more on older adults programming webinar.

Wednesday
Apr032013

Older generation influx will call for programming need

Maureen Hagan presented a session during the IHRSA convention on catering to the older generation.Try these numbers on for size: every day for the next 17 years, 10,000 Baby Boomers will turn 65; the senior population will double, with the 85 and older segment the fastest growing part of the elderly population. 

So, what does that mean and why does the fitness industry need to know this? 

The next set of numbers may answer those questions for you. According to IHRSA, the number of health club members who are 55 years and older grew 343% from 1987 to 2003, compared to 180% for ages 35-54. 

Figure it out yet? 

The fitness industry certainly needs to be aware of the opportunity and responsibility in front of them, which is being cognizant of the needs for older populations, as well as knowing how to provide those needs. 

For the complete story, click here.

Friday
Jul132012

Baby Boomers are hitting the gym

Don't be surprised if you hear The Beach Boys or The Monkees coming out of the headphones of the person working out next to you. The Baby Boomers generation is joining health clubs in record numbers.

According to a recent IHRSA reeport, the number of health club members over 55 grew by 343% from 1987 to 2003, while the number of members in the 35-54 age group increased by 180%.

For more, read the medicinenet.com article