The International Health, Racquet & Sportsclub Association is the fitness industry's only global trade association representing over 10,000 for profit health and fitness facilities and over 600 supplier companies in 75 countries.

 

 



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Friday
Jul152016

5 Ways Health Club Managers Can Lead with Confidence

Trish Blackwell, author of The Skinny, Sexy Mind: The Ultimate French Secret kicked off the MACMA conference in Annapolis, MD this week with an inspirational message on leading with confidence.   

The opening reception at MACMA on Wednesday.

During her session, “Confidence Sells: How to Use Confidence to Increase Sales, Reduce Attrition, and Create a World-Class Facility,” Blackwell shared a number of ways to lead with intention and build a culture of confident employees. That message was reinforced by long time IHRSA members, Mitch Wald, Roger Ralph, Allison Flatley, and Bill McBride during their leadership panel discussion.  

What can you do to lead with confidence?  

  1. Be Available: Make sure your staff understand that your doors are always open.
  2. Build Trust: Do what you said you’ll do, when you said you’ll do it!
  3. Affirm Success: A-players need feedback, oftentimes more than anyone else. Say it out loud—don’t assume they know they are doing a good job.
  4. Measure Your Staff Engagement: Use Gallup’s 12 question survey to better understand your staff.
  5. Invest in Your Staff: Give them the knowledge and skills they need to advance their careers.  

Learn how other health club operators recognize their top employees in our “Best Practice” blog post on hiring and staffing.

Reader Comments (2)

Another thing to keep in mind is to avoid micromanaging. It might sound obvious, but it's harder than you'd think.

No-one likes being micromanaged. And every boss, manager, CEO etc. would be a lot better off without having to micromanage.

Of course this means having the right people on board. But it also means letting go of one's ego, and put that money where one's mouth is when it comes to that ever-important trust between boss and employee.

If you don't trust your employees to do a good job, you're ultimately not being a confident leader, and you're indirectly showing incompetence.
May 9, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterAndy Kay
Another thing to keep in mind is to avoid micromanaging. It might sound obvious, but it's harder than you'd think.

No-one likes being micromanaged. And every boss, manager, CEO etc. would be a lot better off without having to micromanage.

Of course this means having the right people on board. But it also means letting go of one's ego, and put that money where one's mouth is when it comes to that ever-important trust between boss and employee.

If you don't trust your employees to do a good job, you're ultimately not being a confident leader, and you're indirectly showing incompetence.
May 11, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterAndy Kay

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